4 Logo Examples That Prove You Shouldn’t Fix Something That Isn’t Broken

4 Logo Examples to Consider Before You Rebrand

Redesigning a logo seems to be the easiest way to refresh a brand that’s becoming stale. But how do you know a logo redesign is necessary? Here are 4 cautionary tales of logo examples that prove you should leave something alone if it’s still working.

Keyword(s): logo examples

Your consumers can learn a lot about you just by visualizing your brand. One of the key components to creating that image is, well, creating an image. Companies need an on-brand logo to help their audience better resonate with themselves.

Most entrepreneurs allow their logo to evolve over time, which consumers do take notice of. The problem is that many logo redesigns miss their mark and/or confuse their audience.

They say “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. While this often holds true, it’s always a good idea to think of ways to refresh a brand. However, it must be done in good taste.

Learn from these 4 logo examples that didn’t go according to plan.

1. Black & Decker

Most of us recognize Black & Decker as a leading supplier in power tools. Since they expanded their line to include home appliances, they decided it was time for a logo revamp.

The problem with their new logo is that it doesn’t allude to the powerful, solid brand that we once knew. It appears too soft for a company that’s primary focus is still tools and hardware. What’s even worse is that most of us would read their logo as “Black plus Decker”, not “Black and Decker”.

2. Oxford Dictionaries

Okay, we get it. Targeting to a younger demographic is no easy challenge, and there are obvious limitations. But, please don’t pull an Oxford Dictionary.

Essentially, they morphed an assortment of young-brand logos into a cliche conglomerate. They’ve got basically the same icon from Beats by Dre, Target’s font, and Twitter’s color scheme.

If your audience falls on the younger side, you need to prioritize creativity. Oxford Dictionary deviated away from their professional look, and it ended up backfiring.

3. JCPenney

Aesthetic-wise, JCPenney’s logos haven’t been so bad. However, this department store’s problem is that they’ve launched 4 new logos in under 10 years. This is an extreme example, but companies can still learn from their mistakes.

Be mindful of how often you rebrand because flip-flopping will only confuse your audience. These rebranding efforts didn’t just leave a bad taste for JCPenney’s consumers. They also had to be quite expensive and time-consuming.

4. AirBnB

The last redesigned logo we’ll leave you with is actually pretty controversial. At first glance, you may think AirBnb’s new logo isn’t so bad.

But, after looking at it for any longer than a few seconds, you’ll realize: it looks provocative. Now, of course, their marketing staff wasn’t going for a logo that comes across as some kind of dirty innuendo.

This is a good example of how you need to be extremely careful in design work. Try to avoid any icon that could be perceived as inappropriate in any way.

For the Best Logo Examples

Now that you’ve seen the worst, let us show you some good logo examples! Visit our Project Spotlight page to check out our portfolio of previous client work.

If you’re looking for a logo revamp, we’d love to help. Contact us today to learn more about our design services!

Austin Terrill

Austin is the founder and CEO of Print Peppermint. He loves art, graphic design, printing, music, recording gear, synthesizers, and ice cream. He lives in Berlin with his wife and two children.

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